Anti-Heroes: The Complete Collection is here!

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posted by | on anti-heroes, fantasy, latest releases, new adult, serial novel, superheroes, supervillains, witches, young adult | No comments

antiheroes_collection7 My writing partner K.H. Koehler and I are thrilled to let you know Anti-Heroes is now available in one complete volume!

About: Get Ready to Root for the Villain…

Serena is the new girl in a school that caters to not just “Norms,” but the sons and daughters of the world’s greatest Superheroes. The problem? She’s the daughter of the Night Witch, a cardinal member of the League of Extreme Evil. She’d love to join the other super teens and prove she isn’t the villain that her mother was, but it isn’t long before she falls in with a group of Supervillains that the school calls the Geek Squad, which includes a biochemically created vampire named Nikki, a genetically altered jock named Isaac, and Jinx, the son of Satan himself!

She’s immediately attracted to Jinx, but Serena has vowed to do what’s right. But there are secrets buried deep within Serena’s past that threaten to kill her, and even rock the foundation of Earth itself! An evil decay is reaching out from a distant star, and the Supers and Geeks will need to work together in order to defeat it–if they can keep from killing each other. The Supers thought the greatest battle for control of Earth had been fought and won, but a cosmic war is coming, and it isn’t long before it’s difficult to tell the difference between hero and villain.

Anti-Heroes, The Complete Collection includes:

New Girl (Book I)
Bad Boy (Book II)
Half Life (Book III)
Power Play (Book IV)
Magic Man (Book V)
Witch Wars (Book VI)
Plus an Introduction by Gregory Hall (yes, THE Funky Werepig!)

Available On Kindle US
Available On Kindle CA
Available On Kindle UK
Available On Omnilit
Available On Kobo
Available On Nook
Available on Smashwords

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posted by | on dark fantasy, fairies, fantasy, folklore, free reads, halloween, horror, latest releases, reviews, serial novel, witches, young adult | No comments

Hey folks,

Many thanks going out to Shaya Crabtree for her recent review of The Black Act Book 1: Witch Twins Born. She gave the book four out of five stars. Here’s some of what Shaya had to say below:

“Louise Bohmer is clearly an author who has taken the time to plan out the details of the fantasy world in the Witch Twins Saga in her mind. While the author is an expert of her world, the reader may not immediately be. While the book does not just throw the reader in the middle of the action without some sort of explanation of the magical world Claire and Anna live in, it does not detail every aspect of the society. I got a vague idea of some sorts of going-ons, but to really get an idea of what was happening, I had to continue reading. The world slowly opened up to me and it became easier to learn individual’s roles and homelands and histories as the book went on, but they were not the clearest things to understand, especially in the beginning. I feel like more would be explained by reading the second book as well and maybe also rereading the first book.

That being said, the characters are great, especially Claire and Anna, twin sisters. They interact just how sisters do, fighting and arguing, wanting their privacy from one another, but caring for each other at the same time. Their relationship is very believable and realistic. The bond between them is strong and the reader can attach to it and relate to it instantly.”

Thanks again, Shaya! You can read the full review here.

And you can grab Witch Twins Born for free at Amazon, Kobo, and Smashwords. Plus Book 2: Witch Twins Secrets is now available for under a dollar. Just click the links here, visit The Black Act page, or click the book covers below to grab your copies.

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Book 3: Witch Twins Cursed will be released sometime in August, and I’ll be posting a cover reveal soon!

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posted by | on dark fantasy, fairies, fantasy, folklore, free reads, halloween, horror, latest releases, serial novel, witches, young adult | 2 comments

Hey folks!

Now you can grab part two of my fantasy serial, The Black Act: Witch Twins Secrets. Cover art, blurb, and buy links below. Don’t forget, you can also pick up part one, The Black Act: Witch Twins Born for free at Amazon, Kobo, on The Black Act page, and at Smashwords. Cover art for that one and download links below too.

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Available On Kindle US
Availlable On Kindle CA
Available On Kindle UK
Available On Kobo
Available On Nook
Available on Smashwords

This is a serial fantasy novel that will be released in regular installments. Watch for Book 3: Witch Twins Cursed coming soon.

The history of a curse is filled with bloody battles, bitter hatred, and dark secrets.

Through five generations, ghosts of war haunt the wise women. When the rebellion of Glenna ends, their curse sleeps bound in the Tunnels of the Dead, waiting for its chance to re-awaken the war between the wood people and Dalthwein clans. Claire, a wise woman born in the valley of the fae, unwittingly helps it escape imprisonment, while her twin sister Anna receives psychic glimpses of ancient secrets she must unravel. With her scribe teacher Rosalind, she also struggles to uncover the reasons behind Claire’s strange behavior, ever escalating since the death of their guild mother, Grianne.

The Age of the Wise Women will cease if the curse does not end with Anna and Claire. Perhaps inheriting the mistakes of their ancestors and learning the truths of their identities will bring great suffering for these witch twins.

In Book 2: Witch Twins Secrets Anna begins having visions of the witch guild’s creation history, and Claire reveals the devastating secret their guild mother told her before she died.


And pick up Book 1 for free!
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Download the PDF
FREE On Kindle US
Available On Kindle CA
Available On Kindle UK
FREE On Kobo
Available On Nook
FREE on Smashwords

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posted by | on dark fantasy, fantasy, fantasy tropes, guest blogs, young adult | No comments

Hey folks!

Lisa Hook drops by again today with some tips for writing fantasy fiction your readers will love. Take a peek below.

How to Write Fantasy Fiction that your Readers will Love

Witches, demons, vampires and werewolves… they have been entertaining and absorbing us for some time now and, despite their longevity, the trend for this type of fantasy fiction is far from dying out. Paranormal fiction sales are booming, particularly in the young adult market, and they show no signs of slowing down. The public knows what it likes and it likes the fantasy genre: the darker the better. The challenge today is to come up with something original that hasn’t been done before. Once you’ve done your research, you’re ready to jump into the fray and, with a few simple tips about fantasy writing, you can create the type of fiction that your readers will love and will want to come back to again and again.

The World is the Key

Creating a unique world that absorbs the reader and pulls them in is such a crucial factor in writing good fantasy novels. You need to make the world as real as possible in your own mind, so flesh it out and cover every aspect of it so that when your characters journey through it, the reader will believe it. Think about the laws of your world, the moons and tides and gravity, the weather and geography of the land and races that inhabit the world. If you don’t take the time to create something that you believe in, how do you expect your reader to? The world of Hogwarts, Middle Earth, Never Land and Utopia were painstakingly brought to life because of the detail given to them. It is a good idea to map out the world, as well as the plot.

Characters

The world should reflect the characters and vice versa, if they don’t, your reader won’t suspend disbelief in the story. Don’t stick to 21st Century characters because this won’t work if your world is set a long time ago or in the distant future, unless the character is a time traveler. Readers like multiple stories that follow the characters through a series of events, but only if they like and believe in the characters.

Avoid clichés. Let characters be real people, with real problems. The orphan and ‘chosen one’ has been over-used in fantasy fiction and should be laid to rest unless he or she has some great idiosyncrasies that give the scenario a smack of reality. Similarly, there is usually a destiny or prophecy that will be resisted at first, but this causes many readers a great deal of frustration these days and they lose interest in the story. If the character undergoes a series of challenges that are unexpected however, and their personality develops with the story, this is a much better method to employ.

Take some time to think about your character’s personality as well as their physical appearance. The temptation among fantasy writers is to make their male and female leads beautiful beyond belief, with in depth aesthetic details such as the color of their hair and eyes and their lean physical form. The trend used to be that characters were defined by how smart they were, intellectually speaking, but from the 80s onwards, that changed radically to how good they looked.

Imagine instead a character that is quirky and who is defined by their personality rather than outward appearance. Imagine someone who is in the grip of a compulsion, such as an addiction for opium or for food. At once they become more real and more compelling than their counterparts. They could lose what they are striving to achieve because of this simple flaw in their character and at the same time the reader will relate to them. In Dragon Prince, by Melanie Rawn, the magic users become addicted to the drug that enhances their abilities, while in Tolkien’s fantasies, dwarves are often portrayed as drunks. The flaw doesn’t have to be a serious addiction like alcohol or drugs. It may simply be an appetite for something, such as an eating disorder. Research into such topics will throw light on them fairly quickly. For example, a character who overeats because of a compulsion to do so, can be found to be suffering from a craving, because ‘cravings are linked to our emotions and the need for comfort’ according to Licensed Prescriptions. By taking the time to research compulsions, addictions and other psychological traits, you can create flesh and blood characters that evoke empathy among your audience.

Structure

Structure can be difficult to keep organized in this genre because there may be sub-plots and various layers to the storytelling that are easy to lose track of. Your reader needs to be kept absorbed and enthralled by everything that is going on: there needs to be continuity in the plot as well as characters. So how do you manage all this?

A good method of organizing structure is to make a list, with each point representing the next event in the story. Writer’s Digest suggests using a stack of index cards, with each one featuring a one-line synopsis of a scene, and stick to one scene per card. You can order your scenes as you want them, and then add one or two sub-plots with your index cards too. Lay your cards out onto a table and order them where they would go best in your novel. When you think you have finished, simply go through them and see if your story makes sense. If it doesn’t, tear up cards and add new ones. A logical method like this can really work when you’re tackling a fantasy novel.

Copyright (C) 2013 Lisa Hook

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