Old School Review From Gef Fox

Home Page // Archive by category "reviews" (Page 3)

Archive for the ‘reviews’ Category

posted by | on dark fantasy, folklore, halloween, horror, monsters, reviews | No comments

Much thanks goes out to Gef Fox of Wag The Fox blog for his recent Old School review. Keep checking Gef’s blog for his Summer of Short Fiction posts, which will have more Old School goodness included. We Old School authors are thrilled he enjoyed the anthology.

Check out the full review of Old School here:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/340675654

Why not grab a copy of Old School while you’re at it? Fourteen short tales offered by David Dunwoody, Jackie Gamber, R. Scott McCoy,Natalie L. Sin, Horace James, Gregory L. Hall, and Louise Bohmer, all tied together by selected poems from Zombie Zak – Old School reminds one of terrors best not forgotten.

Within these pages, evil children terrorize, witches gather the teeth of the young, cosmic blobs eat the world, while creepy crawlies ruin a man’s life and a headless ghost seeks revenge. Wander down this spooky path with poems and stories that revive our nightmares about golems, harpies, and other creatures.

Share

posted by | on erotic romance, guest blogs, horror, monsters, reviews, steampunk | 2 comments

This review is part of The Werewolf Run to help promote the release of K.H Koehler’s werewolf novel, A Werewolf in Time (Mrs. McGillicuddy #2). Please visit Amazon and Barnes & Noble online for information on ordering a copy of the book for your Kindle or Nook. To see where she’ll be in the next month, visit: http://www.khkoehler.com/the-werewolf-run/

CURSE OF THE WEREWOLF (1961)

Hammer Films. The words evoke bright, eye-watering images of blood-slathered damsels in distress, evil Counts and Barons, strained corsets, and hapless villagers being victimized—and often slaughtered—en masse. In the early 1960’s, the Hammer Film studio wanted to crank out films that undermined—or, at the very least, made fun of—the sometimes ridiculously puritanical films being shoveled out by Universal Pictures under the misnomer of “horror.” Universal, like all American film studios from 1930 until 1968, was shackled by the Motion Picture Production Code, which forbid a formidably long laundry list of “indecent” or “immoral” behavior in motion pictures. But the UK, Italy and other countries which were heavily influencing films during the 1960’s, weren’t restricted by such guidelines and so were free to produce films like Curse of the Werewolf, a film that, with its subtle sexuality and not-so-subtle violence, would never have passed approval in America until at least the late 1960’s, when the Motion Picture Production Code began to fail.

Curse of the Werewolf was another film that made the popular circuit of Saturday afternoon matinee channels in my time. I remember it fondly as the “Oliver Reed werewolf movie.” I’d had, and still have, an ongoing crush on the young Oliver Reed, and his moody, almost manic-depressive performance in the movie makes me wish he’d done more Hammer films. But I can only guess that in some ways, Reed, who was a fairly popular leading man at the time, was kind of slumming it a bit by doing the movie. That or someone got him very drunk. I should like to thank that man.

Curse of the Werewolf is roughly based on the novel The Werewolf of Paris by Guy Endor. Following a more literary path toward its storytelling than most werewolf films, it actually starts decades before the real story even begins, with an old beggar being taken in by a cruel marques in 18th Century Spain. He’s used as entertainment for some festivities, and then tossed into a prison and quickly forgotten. During that time, his only contact with the outside world is the jailer and his beautiful, mute (and nameless) daughter. Some fifteen years later, the evil, decrepit marques makes advances on the now adult daughter, but when she rejects him, he throws her to the old, mad beggar, a recipe for disaster. The beggar rapes her and dies.

The girl is released and sent back to entertain the marques (who, frankly, has a few nuts and bolts rolling around his head himself) but manages to kill him before fleeing the castle. Eventually she is found in the forest by the scholar Don Alfredo Corledo and is nursed back to healthy by the kind Don and his housekeeper Theresa. And yet, despite their care, the girls dies some time later while giving birth to a baby on Christmas Day, something Theresa feels is a bad omen. Her fears are quickly realized when the child, adopted by Don Alfredo, cannot even be christened without the somber cry of some hellborn beast ringing out over the village.

The real story starts as the boy, Leon, grows from a child to a man and slowly becomes overwhelmed by his own bloodlust and the curse that has followed him from his birth. He learns that the love of a good woman could theoretically save and redeem him, but it just might not be enough as the man and the wolf battle for dominance over Leon’s body. The interesting twist here is that Leon is cursed through violent circumstances not of his own doing. He was cursed, and damned, before he was ever born. Not many werewolf movies today make use of the older methods of contracting lycanthropy, such as being a child of rape, committing a great act of evil, finding a belt of wolf fur, or drinking water from the paw print of a wolf. The film is unique in that it calls back to the older legends, many of which were long ago mixed-up and confused with similar tropes of witchcraft and vampirism.

Curse of the Werewolf remains one of my favorite Hammer films, and one of my favorite werewolf movies of all time. The complexity of its storytelling and the beautiful, almost garish (and very Hammeresque) sets and filming alone are worth the price of admission.

4 pentacles out of 5.

Agree or disagree? Share your opinion below.


Click the cover to grab a copy of A Werewolf In Time for your Kindle.

Share

posted by | on erotic fiction, erotic romance, erotic romance releases, erotica, latest releases, reviews | No comments

Kate Jonez gave Passion Plays a 5 star review over at Amazon, and she had this to say about the collection:

“An excellent collection of stories. The author has a talent for creating compelling characters which makes the stories fascinating. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys well-crafted erotica.” –Kate Jonez, dark fantasy author / OG chief editor

Much thanks, Kate! Check it out here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0078TNMPG

Are you a reviewer interested in a copy of Passion Plays? I have EPUB and MOBI format available, if you’re interested in reviewing the collection. Drop me an email at blackfaery76@yahoo.ca or DM me on Facebook or Twitter, and I’ll send you a copy over.

Now Available for your Kindle. Only $2.99!

Passion Plays takes you on a variety of steamy journeys. Female P.I.s seduce a rival detective to score a high-paying case. David, the rebellious print-out prostitute, comes to kill his maker, but his cloned Madame has other plans. A female tattoo artist teaches her apprentice some sexy lessons, while a fiery redhead enchants a young farm boy. A loving partner sets up a surprise ménage for his lady, complete with paddles and handcuffs. Best friends take their relationship to a different level, while the movie theater gets hot for one bored and horny couple. And love gets complicated by family commitments mixed with mob rules. All this and more packed into nine sizzling stories.

This collection is intended for a mature readership over 18 years of age.

Share

posted by | on dark fantasy, horror, latest releases, reviews | No comments

There’s a new review for Detritus posted over at Horrornews.net. Thanks to Sheri White for checking the collection out. Sheri found the collection okay overall, but did mention some of her favorites from Kealan Patrick Burke, Brent Michael Kelley, Jeremy Shipp, and a few others.

You can check out the full review here: http://horrornews.net/51774/book-review-detritus-editors-s-s-michaels-kate-jonez/


Featuring: Kealan Patrick Burke, Jeremy C, Shipp, Mary Borsellino, Brent Michael Kelley, Phil Hickes, L.S. Murphy, Michael R. Colangelo, Neil Davies, Louise Bohmer, Edmund Colell, S.P. Miskowski, Michael Montoure, Lee Widener, Pete Clark, and Opal Edgar.

The impulse to collect springs from deep within the human psyche Squirrels gather acorns, rats collect shiny things, but only humans assign meaning to the objects they collect. Detritus is a collection of stories about the impulse to collect, preserve, and display gone horribly wrong.

Grab a copy for your Kindle here. Paperback available from Omnium Gatherum or Amazon.

Please vote for our tags on our Amazon page. It helps up our ranking!

Share

posted by | on contests, dark fantasy, horror, reviews | No comments

Another great giveaway is running until April 30. This time Detritus, the new horror anthology edited by Kate Jonez and S.S. Michael, is up for grabs. And you even have a chance to snag a print copy with your hairy palms. Details below, and much thanks to Velvet over at vvb32 Reads for running this.

Velvet also reviewed Detritus, and she gave it 5 out of 5. Her one word description: creepy. Check out the full review and giveaway here: http://vvb32reads.blogspot.ca/2012/04/village-outskirts.html

Giveaway Details

3 winners for print – for US and Canada only

3 winners for ebook – for all

Offer ends: April 30, 2012

What you have to do to enter:

Add Detritus to your Goodreads

or

Add Detritus to your Shelfari

or

TWEET Velvet’s post with this title (or click the twitter button on the Detritus review / giveaway post): Giveaway: Detritus: horror anthology edited by Kate Jonez

2. Tell Velvet in the comments what you did.

3. Tell Velvet if you want PRINT (for US and Canada only) or EBOOK along with your email (if I don’t already have it)

Only 4 days left to enter!


Featuring: Kealan Patrick Burke, Jeremy C, Shipp, Mary Borsellino, Brent Michael Kelley, Phil Hickes, L.S. Murphy, Michael R. Colangelo, Neil Davies, Louise Bohmer, Edmund Colell, S.P. Miskowski, Michael Montoure, Lee Widener, Pete Clark, and Opal Edgar.

You can grab Detritus in ebook here, in print here, or from the publisher here.

Share